© Podiatrist Boynton Beach
Building Trades Association
certifiedfoot | Podiatrist Boynton Beach
Podiatrist Boynton Beach - Certified Foot and Ankle Specialist Boynton Beach, FL Office Tel: Podiatrist Boynton Beach | West Boynton Beach 561-369-2199  Foot and Ankle Surgeon Boynton Beach
Podiatrist Boynton Beach - Podiatrist in West Boynton Beach

Dr. MacGill in Podiatry Today Magazine

Study Assesses Impact Of Running Shoes On Plantar Pressures By Lauren Grant, Editorial Assistant A recent study published in the Journal of the American Podiatric Association assessed the impact of cushioning and motion control running shoes on plantar pressures in both low and high arched feet. The study focused on 75 participants, 40 with low arches and 35 with high arches. Researchers compared runners across three different conditions including nonshod, motion control running shoes and cushioning running shoes (employing New Balance athletic shoes). Participants walked 3 mph on a treadmill and researchers measured the mean plantar contact area and mean plantar pressure measurements. The study says participants with low-arched feet showed a significant decrease in the modified arch index when wearing motion control shoes in comparison to wearing cushioned shoes. The study authors note that the running shoes increased the mean midfoot plantar contact area and decreased the mean plantar pressure. This combination with the mean plantar pressure distribution from the rearfoot to the midfoot may have significance in terms of decreasing force transmission and enhancing shock attenuation in the lower extremities, according to the study authors. Alan MacGill, DPM, and Joseph Conte, DPM, say people with high-arched feet should look for athletic shoes that offer increased cushioning. For those with low-arched feet, a motion-control or anti-pronation shoe would work best. For those whose feet fall somewhere in the middle, people should look for a neutral design that offers both cushion and support, according to Dr. MacGill, who practices in Boca Raton, Fla. Dr. MacGill and Dr. Conte have also noticed some common mistakes people make when choosing an athletic shoe. “People often try using an athletic shoe for a sport for which it was not designed. Many athletic shoes are sport-specific and are built to withstand the rigors that come with that sport,” says Dr. MacGill. Dr. Conte, who is in private practice in Orlando, Fla., emphasizes the importance of shoes being more flexible near the toes as opposed to the laces. He says athletic shoes should show “good torsion strength” so feet land evenly during the activity. “You get what you pay for. If a shoe costs less than $75, chances are the shoe is poorly constructed,” maintains Dr. Conte.

Dr. MacGill in Podiatry Today Magazine

Dr. MacGill in Podiatry Today Magazine

© Podiatrist Boynton Beach
Building Trades Association
Podiatrist Boynton Beach - Certified foot In Boynton Beach
Podiatrist Boynton Beach

Dr. MacGill in Podiatry

Today Magazine

Study Assesses Impact Of Running Shoes On Plantar Pressures By Lauren Grant, Editorial Assistant A recent study published in the Journal of the American Podiatric Association assessed the impact of cushioning and motion control running shoes on plantar pressures in both low and high arched feet. The study focused on 75 participants, 40 with low arches and 35 with high arches. Researchers compared runners across three different conditions including nonshod, motion control running shoes and cushioning running shoes (employing New Balance athletic shoes). Participants walked 3 mph on a treadmill and researchers measured the mean plantar contact area and mean plantar pressure measurements. The study says participants with low-arched feet showed a significant decrease in the modified arch index when wearing motion control shoes in comparison to wearing cushioned shoes. The study authors note that the running shoes increased the mean midfoot plantar contact area and decreased the mean plantar pressure. This combination with the mean plantar pressure distribution from the rearfoot to the midfoot may have significance in terms of decreasing force transmission and enhancing shock attenuation in the lower extremities, according to the study authors. Alan MacGill, DPM, and Joseph Conte, DPM, say people with high-arched feet should look for athletic shoes that offer increased cushioning. For those with low-arched feet, a motion- control or anti-pronation shoe would work best. For those whose feet fall somewhere in the middle, people should look for a neutral design that offers both cushion and support, according to Dr. MacGill, who practices in Boca Raton, Fla. Dr. MacGill and Dr. Conte have also noticed some common mistakes people make when choosing an athletic shoe. “People often try using an athletic shoe for a sport for which it was not designed. Many athletic shoes are sport-specific and are built to withstand the rigors that come with that sport,” says Dr. MacGill. Dr. Conte, who is in private practice in Orlando, Fla., emphasizes the importance of shoes being more flexible near the toes as opposed to the laces. He says athletic shoes should show “good torsion strength” so feet land evenly during the activity. “You get what you pay for. If a shoe costs less than $75, chances are the shoe is poorly constructed,” maintains Dr. Conte.

Dr. MacGill in Podiatry Today

Magazine

Dr. MacGill in Podiatry Today Magazine

Please Call 855-550-FEET ( 855-550-3338 )